This Discussion channel is currently closed.
V3_main

The Planning Department and the Town Planning and Zoning Commission is in the process of updating the Plan of Conservation and Development (POCD).

The POCD outlines visions, goals, and strategies to guide conservation and development in Windsor over the next ten years and beyond. Topics include residential development, historic resources, economic development, transportation, natural resources, open space, agricultural resources, community facilities, enhancing the villages, utilities, and the Day Hill Corporate Area.

Several draft chapters are available for your review on the Planning Department website.

We want your input! How can we continue to make Windsor a desirable community to live, work, and play?

Small2_100_0967

Please answer yes or no. Should the town regulate the design and appearance of development in Windsor’s villages to protect historic and architectural character?

Once you're through leaving your input, click here to choose a new topic.

7 Responses

Default_avatar
mark dressler over 2 years ago

Yes - Windsor should absolutely regulate the design and appearance of development in the villages...

1 Vote
 
Default_avatar
Lisa Bress over 2 years ago

Yes, especially in historic districts. It makes Windsor an attractive place to live.

1 Vote
 
Bootstrap_531316055
Dave Mourad over 2 years ago

Yes, absolutely! As Connecticut's First Town (sorry Wethersfield), Windsor has a unique and notable presence and responsibility to uphold that distinction.

1 Vote
 
Default_avatar
Janette Coffin over 2 years ago

Yes. So long as it's not micro-managed and excessive. Maintaining architectural character is one thing, having HOA-like requirements that dictate whether you can have a clothesline or a red mailbox is another!

1 Vote
Bootstrap_eric
Eric Barz, Town Planner admin over 2 years ago

Janettte,

Been there done that (HOA)! No, it would be more like keeping within the architectural character of the respective village and trying to move parking to the side and rear, emphasizing pedestrian access at the front (think West Hartford Center without making further comparison, since we will never compare otherwise).

0 Votes
 
 
Default_avatar
Carolyn Hoffman over 2 years ago

Yes!

0 Votes
 
Default_avatar
Richard Shea over 2 years ago

One of the seemingly diminishing identifying factors of Windsor is its architectural characteristics. The West side of Broad Street remains full of many of its original buildings. The East side has had a few of its notable historical buildings removed but largely remains historically in tact. I would be in favor of ensuring that future buildings and renovations to existing buildings reflect the historical signifigance of Windsor. I point specifically to the Library. Having taken a historic house and add such a modern looking structure to it makes the original building almost invisible. The library should have either been a completely separate new building or constructed to more adequately reflect the age and historical signifigance of the existing structure.

0 Votes